Why Educational Remediation?

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Child Development, Inclusive Education

Schools often put a huge amount of pressure on children. They are put in a class of 30 or 40; asked to learn, pay attention, not move, be interested and motivated to do work. While many children have the ability to cope with these pressures, there is also a group of children who find it difficult to cope. These children show subtle signs that may often go unnoticed. They may be the ones who score below average or sometimes even the ones who score above. They will sometimes exhibit disturbing behaviors or have drastic mood changes. They often are the ones who will do anything to get out doing school work that has been given to them.

Remediation for children with difficult in school

The signs are subtle but every now and then, a teacher or parent will notice that these children are missing out on something. At times, a teacher may make a recommendation for the child to be tested for any learning issues or cognitive differences. As I have seen from my experience, there are those parents who will take their child based on the recommendation, but there are also those who will find it difficult to accept. In certain instances, the children who’ve been tested may show certain cognitive differences and learning issues that may attribute to their negative behaviors in school. So what next?

Educational Remediation

Now these children may not specifically exhibit issues that fall under labels such as Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, ADHD, Autism and so on but they have overlapping areas of concern that needs a different kind of approach. Educational remedial therapy is the next step for these children to support them in developing better learning strategies and providing them with the skills necessary to live in this social world. This type of therapy is for those kids who do not fall under a specific category but still need the kind of support that a therapist can offer.  

A therapist who has training in special education will be able to identify the specific areas of concern and work towards providing strategies to overcome those difficulties. This person will support the child in understanding academic concepts to make school life more manageable. A tutor will work on subject areas and the general curriculum which can be done by any person who is knowledgeable in that area. This kind of therapy is like any other where it needs time and patience for it to properly show some progress in the child. Consistency is another major factor for therapy to work. If the child does not attend sessions regularly then the level of progress will be very slow. Any kind of psychological therapy has a stigma attached to it but the more we talk about it, the more acceptance there will be. The first step is for parents to accept that even though their child may seem “normal”, they still require more than a tutor.

If you would like to know more about this kind of therapy, please email us at naomi@inclusived.org or message us on our Facebook page.

Acceptance in Therapy

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Child Development, Inclusive Education

Acceptance in therapy is two fold. Firstly, it is the endeavor to completely embrace one’s child for who they are and for any differences they may have. Secondly, it is understanding and being patient with the therapy that a child is undergoing. Acceptance is an easy enough notion to understand but is rather difficult to imbibe. We all face situations where we find it hard to accept the reality in front of us. Our expectations, hopes and desires make it arduous for us to adapt to what is in front of us.

Child accepted by parents is important to therapy.

Therefore, I am completely empathetic towards parents who find it difficult to accept that their child requires different coping mechanisms to go through life. All parents have certain desires and goals that they want their children to achieve and some find it tough to understand that it may not go their way. There’s one thing that I tell all my clients, the first step is acceptance and if you have taken that first step to come for therapy, you have already accomplished a lot.

Many parents tell me that they wish they would have come sooner and of course, that is definitely better for the child. But the fact that they have taken that step to get that extra support for their child is saying a lot. Once parents accept their child as he/she is, they will come to learn and love that person even more. All children, with additional needs or not, thrive when they are accepted for the people that they are and for the interests and desires they may have. Children learn that when they are accepted, they are respected.

The other aspect of acceptance is understanding and being patient with the therapy that your child is undergoing. Any psychological therapeutic process is just what it is, a process. It goes through ups and downs, has its own trials and errors and most importantly, takes time. Sometimes different therapies work differently for a variety of children. It is about being patient with that process and understanding that every child will progress at their own time. The therapeutic process can consist of a variety of techniques to enable the child to develop better coping mechanisms in order to live and work in the world around them.

Accepting your child completely is very important to their growth and their emotional well being. Take one small step each day in moving towards that goal of embracing your child with their strengths and weaknesses and you will see the difference.

At InclusivEd, our endeavour is to support children through an Inclusive approach to learning. Follow us on Facebook to know more.